A study on the young offenders act in canada

New Zealand[ edit ] The New Zealand government has plans to introduce a sex offenders register by the end of

A study on the young offenders act in canada

The Kids of When she awoke, stripped naked, the boys — one 17 years old, the other 16 — brutally sexually assaulted her. A Toronto youth is on trial for the robbery.

For months, the Star has been examining a an issue largely hidden: Watch, as reporter David Bruser offers a preview of the upcoming series The Kids of Bank robber, allegedly a youth, at a Scotiabank.

His trial is ongoing. She has since attempted suicide. Not every youth before the court faces a serious charge. Article Continued Below Theft, vandalism and other relatively minor charges are common. But with regularity, the docket — the daily list of youths identified by their initials and the charges they face — features assault, robbery with a firearm, possession of drugs for the purpose of trafficking and other serious crimes.

In the case of Ricky and Joseph, before sexually assaulting her with a perfume bottle, they made their victim chew on a condom and perform oral sex.

A study on the young offenders act in canada

Ricky then urinated on the girl. The crimes cause physical injuries, emotional trauma, sometimes significant financial loss. The violence leaves victims and witnesses fearing they will be hurt, or worse, in retaliation for their testimony or cooperation with police.

In another case, a man in his 40s would testify only while wearing sunglasses and by remote video feed, for fear of being identified and beaten up by two teen suspects accused of a vicious attack.

The youth justice system coddles kids accused and convicted of serious crimes, a four-month Toronto Star investigation has found. Changes to youth sentencing law in were supposed to fix an overreliance on custody.

Instead, serious offenders are thumbing their noses at the courts because they know they will be treated lightly. Victims feel their voices are not heard. Kids who violently break the law, many from broken homes, are reoffending.

Article Continued Below The story of Jarvis is not just about youth crime and punishment. While some kid offenders are hardened and careless to the fear they leave like a stain on their communities, an alarming number come from families damaged by abandonment, addiction or death.

They pinwheel from one crime to another, angry and hurt and helpless. Their stories are being told in this series of articles. The kids of Jarvis come from Regent Park and Swansea Mews, Vaughan Road and Parma Court, streets and neighbourhoods well known to detectives and the K-9 units and specialized Emergency Task Force officers who are increasingly called on to investigate crimes involving youth.

Though born after the Blue Jays won the World Series, many of the kids featured in this series have already lived a life of crime. And imitation firearms, capable of air-firing only a pellet, but to the holdup victim appearing as real as the kind that fires a bullet.

Sighting down the barrel, this is how many Toronto kids steal money, rob drug dealers of their product, feel protected on the streets. At a bail hearing for two youths accused of participating in a gunpoint robbery, a justice of the peace said: Some youth dealers make furtive transactions in parks and coffee shop bathrooms, but often the switch of drugs for money is clumsier — on a busy street corner for anyone to see.The government has appointed a five-member panel to study the cases of more than 1, missing and murdered indigenous women and girls.

In Canada’s criminal justice system, anyone older than 11 or younger than 18 is subject to their own specific legislation, called the Youth Criminal Justice Act. While its critics claim it is far too lenient on youth offenders, its proponents argue that its principles, based on evidence, are sound, and that on the whole, the YCJA is working.

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A young offender facility in Canada needed an anti-climb device that was effective but didn’t look threatening. The solution that worked best: Roller Barrier.

Norfolk’s Wymondham Library is an award-winning modern building. Myth: "The majority of sexual offenders are caught, convicted, and in prison." Fact: Only a fraction of those who commit sexual assault are apprehended and convicted for their crimes.

Most convicted sex offenders eventually are released to the community under probation or parole supervision. The Young Offenders Act (YOA; French: Loi sur les jeunes contrevenants) (the Act) was an act of the Parliament of Canada, granted Royal Assent in and proclaimed in force on April 2, , that regulated the criminal prosecution of Canadian youths.

The act was repealed in with the passing of the Youth Criminal Justice Act. 2 ¤ Myth: “The majority of sexual offenders are caught, convicted, and in prison.” þ Fact: Only a fraction of those who commit sexual assault are apprehended and convicted for their crimes.

Most convicted sex offenders eventually are released to the community under probation or parole supervision.

Fact Sheet: What You Need to Know About Sex Offenders